Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling Hiring Fair- JOB FAIR (Washington, DC)

Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling Hiring Fair
Tuesday, November 7, 2017 

The Bolling Club

Theisen Street, Building 50

Washington, DC 20032 

? Employers and Service Organizations: Click here to register:  https://www.cvent.com/events/hiring-our-heroes-jbab-washington-dc/registration-e1072ccc568a4df098322e0197b69991.aspx?fqp=true   

? Job Seekers: Click here to register:  https://www.cvent.com/events/hiring-our-heroes-jbab-washington-dc/registration-e1072ccc568a4df098322e0197b69991.aspx?fqp=true   

Why register? Job seekers can upload their resumes to be viewed by employers ahead of the event.

 

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Neale & Associates International- Field Service Engineer (National)

BULLETIN  

   Boston  Hartford     Philly   Hartford, CT     Rochester, NY 

Requires  2-3 months  of Navy/Air Force electronic courses and 4-6    years experience  troubleshooting to board and/or component level. Prefer AT, BMET, ET, FC ,or PMEL or comparable rates.  Must have   excellent communication skills. Will travel  a 400-600 mile radius from  home base city by company vehicle  or  by commercial air  and  rental car. Will  install   troubleshoot,  and   maintain    optical measurement instruments.  Prefer  a   motivated, energetic E-4/E-5 with   superior  Navy /Marine Corps/Air Force Evaluations and  one or more  Navy/Air Force Achievement Medals  or Letters  of  Commendation.  Company  laptop,  gas  mileage, and performance bonuses between $8000 and $12,000. Top  benefits.

 

Honorable Discharge, Good Credit and Driving Record and Valid Passport required. Must have December or early January availability for company training class. Please  call  or  write to Lester  Neale: (770) 518-8040 or  678-457-8546 (mobile)  Please  e-mail  resume to:lester.neale@att.net (Word 20007 or later) or PDF format only.

 

Neale & Associates International

8740 Roswell Road, Suite 6D

Atlanta, GA 30350

   

  


Local Goodwill Offering Voucher to Assist Transitioning Veterans

The Goodwill of the Great Plains, which includes the Rapid City Goodwill Store, is offering veterans a $40 voucher towards clothing and accessories to help prepare them for employment. The offer will be from November 9th thru November 22nd, 2014 and you must present a veteran ID card at participating Goodwill stores. Limit one clothing/accessory voucher per person.GoodwillBootsSuits We have confirmed that the Rapid City Goodwill Store is participating.


Teaching as a Second Career Seminar

Ellsworth AFB - TASC - Ad - MAY2013Thinking about a career in teaching?  Come out and join us for a free lunch and gain valuable insight into a new career.


NAF Positions- 31 Jan 2013

JOB   TITLE

GRADE

LOCATION

TYPE

SALARY

01

Waiter NA-7420-02

Dakota’s Club

Flexible

$8.25*

 

02

Cook Leader NL-7404-06

Dakota’s Club

Regular

11.69**

 

03

Cook NA-7404-04

Dakota’s Club

Flexible

$9.74**

 

04

Bartender NA-7405-03

Dakota’s Club

Flexible

$8.77**

 

05

Custodial Worker (Housekeeper) NA-3566-01

Lodging

Flexible

$8.40

 

06

Custodial Worker (Janitor) NA-3566-02

Lodging

Flexible

$8.95   (DTP)

 

07

Guest Services Representative NF-0303-01

Lodging

Flexible

$9.15**

 

08

Child & Youth Program Asst   (Target Level) CY-1702-02

Youth Center

Flexible

$13.41* (DTP)

 

09

Recreation Aid (Lifeguard) NF-0189-01

Pools

Flexible

$8.55

 

10

Pro Shop Technician NA-4819-05

Bandit Lanes Recreation   Center

Flexible

$10.01

 

11

Cashier NF-0530-01

Bandit Lanes Recreation   Center

Flexible

$7.25**

 

12

Tool and Parts Attendant NA-6904-05

Auto Hobby

Flexible

$10.01 (DTP)

 

13

Child & Youth Program Asst   (Target Level) CY-1702-02

Child Development Center

Flexible

$13.41*

 

14

Accounting Technician NF-0525-02

Resource Management

Regular

$9.00

 

15

Library Aid NF-1411-01

Holbrook Library

Flexible

$7.25

 

*Must be 18 years old                         **Must be 21 years old                     DTP- Drug Tested Position


Temp Your Way to a Career

With the economy struggling to improve and unemployment rates at an all time high, we have all heard tales of job seekers waiting months just for a hint of a job offer. For military spouses who plan to relocate this year, the jobs shortage is complicated by the challenges of being new to an area.

It is not all doom and gloom, however; on the positive side, temporary staffing and recruitment agencies report they are especially busy right now. Working for a staffing agency has the added benefit of allowing you to learn about a new area and meet people. Temporary agencies offer many alternatives including long-term temporary, temp-to-permanent, and direct hire positions. When done right, temporary work can be a bridge to permanent employment.

Temporary labor is utilized for a variety reasons. An organization may have a special project to complete, experience seasonal shifts in staffing needs, or they may want to try an employee out before making a commitment to hire. As the economy improves, hiring temporary workers provides an attractive alternative to employers. According to Thane Meads, Director of Operations at Dynamic Recruiting, “In economically hard times–employers are hesitant to spend and do not tend to make many full-time hires. Instead, they utilize more and more temp labor to get work done, as such temp positions are often the only gateway someone has to get into a company when the economy is down.”

Temporary work is a great way to find hidden jobs. According to the American Staffing Association 40% of temporary assignments become permanent positions. Christina Gross, Recruiter at Manpower Inc., one of the world’s largest staffing services states, “We have already seen a number of positions transition into permanent positions within the last two months, and as the economy stabilizes we expect to see more.”

Temporary work is flexible, and allows you to try out a variety of work environments. As a temporary employee you have the freedom to choose when, where, and for how long you work. Another benefit of working for a temporary staffing agency is, well…benefits. Typical perks include medical and dental insurance, 401K’s, and over 90% of temporary agencies provide free training.

Temporary staffing agencies and recruiters operate differently, but can both be useful in your job search. According to Thane Meads, temporary staffing agencies deal with quantity and usually staff jobs requiring basic skills. Temporary agencies are more interested in finding individuals with good work habits. Recruiters on the other hand, typically work with higher level career opportunities.

Ranstad and Manpower are among the largest national temporary agencies and usually have divisions that recruit for higher level careers. There are also many regional and local agencies, so do your homework to find the best fit for you. Some agencies specialize in specific areas such as accounting, medical, technical, or administrative services. Whether you choose a temporary staffing agency or a recruiter, do not feel like you need to commit to just one. Signing-up with multiple agencies increases your chances of placement.

Temporary agencies and recruiters often utilize well-known job boards such as Monster.com to advertise current openings. Start by doing a job search to find staffing agencies or recruiters that have jobs posted of interest to you. You can submit a resume on-line, but you will get a quicker response from a recruiter if you contact them. Thane Meads offers advice for individuals using temporary staffing agencies or recruiters. He says, “each firm is very busy and not as likely to follow-up as most candidates would like or even expect. Do not expect to have anyone hold your hand or get a job for you, but try to use them as facilitators that can help you find uncovered opportunities.”

When you contact an agency a recruiter may conduct a phone interview to determine if your skills match-up with their current customer base. If the recruiter feels they may be able to place you, they will request an in-person interview. Prepare by gathering professional references and polishing your resume. Just like you would at any interview be enthusiastic, flexible, energetic, and display a good attitude.

The interview can take up to 3 hours—yes, really 3 hours. But, do not worry you will not be grilled the entire time. The process consists of several steps, and the interview is just one of them. At the interview you will complete a job application and other employment forms. Usually the interview itself is highly standardized, and will focus on salary expectations, work preferences, and past job experience.

You may be asked to take assessments, which vary depending on the type of work you are seeking. Typically, office workers take tests to show proficiency with Microsoft Office or typing speed. Industrial workers take sorting or assembly skills tests. These tests are designed to assure the temporary employee possess the minimum skills required to be successful on the job. The agency will share test results with you and address any discrepancies between your skill set and the type of work you are seeking.

If the agency has an opening, they may offer you an assignment immediately. The offer will include a description of the working conditions, tasks, hours, and pay rate. It is entirely your decision to take the assignment or not. Be realistic, you do not need to take every assignment. If you are not sure if the job is right for you it is better to say no than to take an assignment you will not be able to complete. Consider every assignment as an opportunity to increase your job skills, build contacts, and improve your employability.

If you are not offered an immediate assignment, you should check-in with the agency periodically. Recruiters interview many candidates each day—they do not remember everyone. Checking-in at least once a week is a good technique to ensure that you are fresh in the recruiters mind when a suitable assignment becomes available. According to recruiter Christina Gross, being flexible is a sure way to stay busy when working for a temporary staffing agency; she says, “We never know what that next phone call may be. If you are able to go to work with a day’s notice and willing to work anywhere then there is a greater chance of getting out to work more often.”

When you go to work you are employed by the staffing service and assigned to their customer. The temporary agency is responsible for issuing pay and withholding appropriately. Temporary staffing agencies do not take a fee from employees—their fees are paid by the customer. Be wary of any agency that takes fees from employees.

Keep in mind, while on assignment, the company you go to work for may be trying to select temporary employees who they feel would be good candidates for permanent employment. They will notice stellar employees. Look for ways to be the kind of employee they will not be able to live without.

Many temporary staffing agencies have experience working with military spouses and understand the challenges they face. Recruiter Christina Gross who works within 15 miles of Fairchild Air Force Base says, “We have worked with a number of military spouses and are always ready to assist them in getting acclimated to a new city. It is especially nice because coming from different parts of the country military spouses bring a variety of different skills to the area and we have had a lot of success.”


DOD Works to Ease Troop Transition to Credentialed Jobs

By Elaine Sanchez
American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON, Feb. 22, 2012 – The Defense Department is working to break down credentialing barriers for service members and veterans preparing to enter the civilian workforce, a DOD official said today.

“The goal … is to help our veterans, and especially our transitioning veterans, … get employed,” Ed Kringer, director of state liaison and educational opportunity for the Pentagon’s office of military community and policy, told an audience gathered for the National Credentialing Summit at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce here.

Speaking on a panel, Kringer described the interagency effort under way to ensure credentialing agencies recognize service members’ extensive training, education and experience.

Many occupations require state licensure, he noted, which affects both service members and their spouses. However, many troops run up against challenges with this, he added, as licensing and credentialing requirements vary from state to state and many credentialing boards are unaware of how military training and education equate to civilian training.

Read the full press release at http://www.defense.gov/news/newsarticle.aspx?id=67290.